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    Mar 6th, 2008 at 01:33:23     -    Rogue Galaxy (PS2)

    Gamelog Entry #2

    GAMEPLAY:

    During my second hour of gameplay, I began my quest to travel across the galaxy. By then the controls had become a bit more familiar than they we’re before, and I began to understand the concepts of the game a lot better. In the beginning I kept dying because I was not paying any attention to my life bar, so I was never aware of the times when I was close to death. Because of that, I was dying a lot, and the fact that I had to go through the “game over” phase and all of the loading screens was frustrating me a lot. But with practice comes perfect, and even though I’m not close to perfect, the game has become more familiar to me, and therefore my gameplay is more effective.

    Most of the time spent in my second hour playing this game was spent watching cutscenes. Some of these were so long that there were moments in which I felt like I was watching a movie. But all of these scenes are very helpful in the development of the story; and the fact that I’m almost playing out a movie is very interesting even though it seems like sometimes you can’t really do any playing. Perhaps it is because it is only the beginning of the game because as I continued playing it appeared to become more open to actual gameplay.

    DESIGN:

    There are many aspects to this game that I haven’t seen on other games that I have played before. For starters, the fact that you can gain allies along your quest is pretty much new to me. But one thing I discovered as I played it for the second time was that these allies not only helped you defeat enemies, but they can also be selected as your avatar when the avatar you were using dies in combat. This was very interesting to me because I’ve never played a game of this type.

    On the level design part of the game, the fields are pretty linear and straight to the point. Even though the worlds seem to be wide open, there is only one way in which the player can go at a time. The game follows a step-by-step process that the player needs to follow in order to advance in the game.

    The way in which different levels are shown is by having them take place in different planets. For each planet that is visited, there is a goal that needs to be reached, and a boss that needs to be beat. Also, the enemies on each planet are completely different in design, and they need to be defeated in different ways. The constant instruction window which appears every time something new comes at you is very helpful. With it you learn new aspects of the game at the time that you’re going to need them, and they seem to be very effective the way they are shown.

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    Mar 5th, 2008 at 23:42:12     -    Rogue Galaxy (PS2)

    Gamelog Entry #1:

    SUMMARY:

    Rogue Galaxy is a game about Jaster Rogue, who lives on a planet called Rose. Apparently, there is a war going on, and Rose has found itself involved in it. When a beast attacks the town where Jaster lives, Jaster finds himself battling along with a stranger, who turns out to be a legendary hunter called Desert Claw. Two pirates who are searching for Desert Claw believe they have found him, when in reality it is Jaster with Desert Claw’s sword. They then tell of their boss who is looking to hire Jaster believing he is the legendary hunter, and our hero gladly accepts their offer in an effort to take advantage of the opportunity to travel across the galaxy.

    GAMEPLAY:

    During the first hour of gameplay, I found myself going through a lot of cut scenes. They begin showing the background story of Jaster, and how he came to live in Rose. Then after a beast attacks the city, I found myself traveling the streets of the town accompanied by a masked stranger. He claims to be my ally, at the moment. We then make our way through constantly appearing enemies, and with each battle comes instructions of how to use the controls and the different strategies in the game.

    After a while, I found myself battling against two stone giants, this time without my ally. They played the part of what appeared to be the miniboss in this section of the game. Soon, losing my previous ally and gaining two new ones, I found myself fighting the beast itself. Through out the battle, my allies helped me fight the beast as they taught me how to do more tricks with my avatar. After they were done teaching me, I was left to fight alone. This section of the game, I believe, is a training session incorporated within the gameplay. Even though the player has already began the game, what they are playing at the moment is an instruction session that will help the player get familiar with the controls and the different aspects of the game.

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    Feb 21st, 2008 at 00:54:36     -    Jak III (PS2)

    GAMELOG ENTRY #2

    GAMEPLAY:

    When I was able to walk around freely outside into the world, I was able to go around a lot of different places, but there was nothing to do outside the town. So even when I thought I had finally found a part of the game where I could wonder around, I found myself going back into the town in order to find something to do.

    As I continued playing inside the town, the missions keep coming and there is not much free world to play. Each mission needs to be completed perfectly, and on races you need to win first place or you fail. This gets really annoying really fast. The fact that I have to continue trying the same race over and over and over again only frustrated me to the point where I began to get angry. To tell the truth, I wasn’t enjoying this game too much. I want to see what happens in the end and what happened in the beginning, but I’m not sure if I’m going to play this game all the way through.

    DESIGN:

    Even though you are able to get out into the world and move around, there is nothing you can actually do besides walk around on it. The entire time that I played I was going from mission to mission. Even though the game is made to look like it has an open world, the story line is very linear. You have to complete different tasks, puzzles and missions to continue the game. The graphics are 3Dimentional and very cartoon-like, which attracts people’s (kids) attentions. I like the fact that there is actual voices through out the entire game instead of reading dialog boxes.

    Also, I enjoy the fact that there are a lot of different aspects to the game. For example, you can ride a “horse creature” and you can ride a motor vehicle. For now that’s all I’ve discovered in the short time that I’ve played.

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    Feb 20th, 2008 at 23:14:39     -    Jak III (PS2)

    GAMELOG ENTRY # 1


    SUMMARY:

    The game begins when Jack is abandoned in the middle of the desert by the people who seem to be his comrades. They claim that what is happening to the city is all his fault and the people don’t want him to be around. After he is left behind with two animal comrades, they take off into the desert. There, they are found by some members of a hidden civilization. During this time, Jack has flashbacks of what happened in the city. They seemed to have been attacked by someone who destroyed their city in the search for something, and for some reason they link the attackers to Jack.

    GAMEPLAY:

    The game begins by throwing you into a training camp which takes place in an arena where the entire hidden civilization is waiting for you to get killed. In this place, you learn step by step how to use each of your controls. Since you have complete control of your camera, it becomes one more control you need to take care of. In the beginning, I was able to go through the jumping part of the tutorial okay, but when it got to the point where I had to kill enemies, I got lost. After many unexplained deaths I finally found my energy bar. That’s when I began to realize the damage I was truly getting while fighting the enemies. Then after many more deaths I realized I could not only shoot them, but also punch them after I ran out of ammo. That way I was able to finish off all twenty enemies I needed to kill to advance to the next step, which was one more thing I wasn’t sure about. It wasn’t until a long time when I realized why it was that I kept killing them and dying and nothing ever happened. So to me, that part of the game was really confusing.

    Eventually I advanced through the game, and I found myself ridding a “horse-creature” looking for kangaroo-rats. During this part of the game I was able to find that I had other powers I didn’t know of, which I could’ve probably used during my training earlier if I had known about them. But this part of the game was helpful so I could see the world of the game.

    When I found a monk and a weird creature, I had to solve a “puzzle” which also had no clear directions of what exactly I was supposed to do, so I was defeated a couple of times. Then I was able to figure out what I was supposed to be doing and finally passed that part of the game. I suppose the puzzle helped me get familiarized with the buttons on the remote because this is one of the first times I play the PS2 and I really couldn’t just remember which buttons were what shape.

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